• St. Nicholas sanctuary in Lent. Photo Credit: Stephen E. Jackson Photography
  • Each year a new Easter Candle is purchased and lit for ...
  • Autumn colors are used in the fall to decorate the sanctuary. ...
  • There are poor boxes at all four entrances of the church. ...

Thank you for visiting the Website of St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Laurel, Maryland, USA.

We are a relaxed, friendly, mid-size parish of families and single adults with room for you! We have plenty of parking and beautiful grounds, and we are looking forward to our 50th anniversary in 2017.

Since 1967, parishioners of St. Nicholas Church have worshipped God and served the people of Laurel, Maryland. We are a diverse and growing community of grace, healing and salvation, and we invite you to join us for Mass and parish celebrations.

Vision Statement

St. Nicholas Catholic Parish is a center of grace, healing and salvation. Jesus Christ and His Gospel are the heart of our parish. St. Nicholas is a sanctuary where we find a sense of meaning and purpose. The celebration of Mass and the Sacraments are the means by which we give glory to God, and the Eucharist is the food that nourishes our life with Christ. Our faith and hope are in Christ alone, and our love for Jesus makes us willing to share our time, talent and treasure with our neighbors on earth to build the Kingdom of God. St. Nicholas is our support and our family.

Mass Times

Weekend Masses
5:00 p.m. Saturday
8:00 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
11:30 a.m. Sunday

Weekday Mases
8:30 a.m. in the church, Monday to Saturday
6:30 p.m. on Fridays of Lent, followed by Stations of the Cross at 7:00 p.m.

Office Hours

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday
For emergencies after hours, call 301-490-5116 and follow the directions to reach Father Jack Keneally, pastor.

Events

April

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

View all events »

Staff

Google Map

Blog Summary

Daily Readings

Saint of the Day

St. Zita of Lucca

On April 27 the Catholic Church honors Saint Zita, a 13th century Italian woman whose humble and patient service to God has made her a patron saint of maids and other domestic workers.Born into poverty during the early 1200s, Zita was taught by her mother from an early age to seek God's will in all circumstances. She had already developed a strong prayer life by the time she was sent, at age 12, to work in the home of the Fatinelli family in Lucca.Zita's employers lived near a church where she managed – by waking up extremely early in the morning – to attend daily Mass. She looked upon her work primarily as a means of serving God, and kept herself mindful of his presence during long hours of exhausting tasks.Her presence in the Fatinelli household, however, was inexplicably unwelcome and met with harsh treatment for a number of years. Zita suffered hostility and abuse from her employers, including fits of rage and beatings.The young woman faced these trials with patience and inner strength developed through a life of prayer. In time, the members of the household came to value her service, and appreciate the virtues she had acquired through God's grace.Zita maintained her humility when she was promoted to a position of responsibility within the Fatinelli home. She continued to view her earthly responsibilities as a service to God, and to seek his presence through prayer and fasting. She also refused to hold a grudge against those who once mistreated her.Within her new household role, Zita was faithful to Christ's admonition that superiors should conduct themselves as the servants of all. She was kind to those under her direction, and mindful of the poor through frequent almsgiving to the point of personal sacrifice.Throughout her life, Zita found a source of strength and consolation in the Mass and Holy Communion, which frequently moved her to tears. Despite her many responsibilities, she frequently set aside time to recall God's presence through contemplative prayer in the course of the day.After foretelling her own death and spiritually preparing for it, Saint Zita died in Lucca on April 27, 1271. Many residents regarded her as a saint and began to seek her intercession, to which a large number of miracles were attributed. Some writers even began referring to the city of Lucca as “Santa Zita� in her honor.The Fatinelli family, which had once caused St. Zita such extreme suffering, eventually contributed to the cause of her canonization. The earliest account of her life was found in a manuscript belonging to the family, and published in 1688.The Church's liturgical veneration of St. Zita was introduced in the early 1500s, and confirmed by Pope Innocent XII in 1696. In 1580, her body was exhumed and found to be miraculously incorrupt. It is venerated today in the Basilica of St. Frediano, where she attended Mass during her life.

Read More