• St. Nicholas sanctuary in Lent. Photo Credit: Stephen E. Jackson Photography
  • Each year a new Easter Candle is purchased and lit for ...
  • Autumn colors are used in the fall to decorate the sanctuary. ...
  • There are poor boxes at all four entrances of the church. ...

Holy Week Services

Holy Thursday - 7:30 PM Mass

Good Friday - Stations at 3:00 PM, Service at 7:30 PM (No 8:30 AM Mass)

Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday - 8:00 PM (no 8:30 AM Mass and no 5:00 PM Mass)

Easter Sunday Masses - 8:00 AM, 9:30 AM, and 11:30 AM 

Thank you for visiting the Website of St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Laurel, Maryland, USA.

We are a relaxed, friendly, mid-size parish of families and single adults with room for you! We have plenty of parking and beautiful grounds.

Since 1967, parishioners of St. Nicholas Church have worshiped God and served the people of Laurel, Maryland. We are a diverse and growing community of grace, healing and salvation, and we invite you to join us for Mass and parish celebrations.

Vision Statement

St. Nicholas Catholic Parish is a center of grace, healing and salvation. Jesus Christ and His Gospel are the heart of our parish. St. Nicholas is a sanctuary where we find a sense of meaning and purpose. The celebration of Mass and the Sacraments are the means by which we give glory to God, and the Eucharist is the food that nourishes our life with Christ. Our faith and hope are in Christ alone, and our love for Jesus makes us willing to share our time, talent and treasure with our neighbors on earth to build the Kingdom of God. St. Nicholas is our support and our family.

Mass Times

Weekend Masses
5:00 p.m. Saturday
8:00 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
11:30 a.m. Sunday

Weekday Mases
8:30 a.m. in the church, Monday to Saturday

Office Hours

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
For emergencies after hours, call 301-490-5116 and follow the directions to reach Father Mel Ayala, pastor.

Events

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Daily Readings

Saint of the Day

Easter Sunday

Easter is the principal feast of the ecclesiastical year. Leo I (Sermo xlvii in Exodum) calls it the greatest feast (festum festorum), and says that Christmas is celebrated only in preparation for Easter. It is the centre of the greater part of the ecclesiastical year.To have a correct idea of the Easter celebration and its Masses, we must remember that it was intimately connected with the solemn rite of baptism. The preparatory liturgical acts commenced on the eve and were continued during the night. When the number of persons to be baptized was great, the sacramental ceremonies and the Easter celebration were united. This connection was severed at a time when, the discipline having changed, even the recollection of the old traditions was lost. The greater part of the ceremonies was transferred to the morning hours of Holy Saturday.Commemorating the slaying of the true Lamb of God and the Resurrection of Christ, the corner-stone upon which faith is built, it is also the oldest feast of the Christian Church, as old as Christianity, the connecting link between the Old and New Testaments.  The connection between the Jewish Passover and the Christian feast of Easter is real and ideal. Real, since Christ died on the first Jewish Easter Day; ideal, like the relation between type and reality, because Christ's death and Resurrection had its figures and types in the Old Law, particularly in the paschal lamb, which was eaten towards evening of the 14th of Nisan. In fact, the Jewish feast was taken over into the Christian Easter celebration; the liturgy (Exsultet) sings of the passing of Israel through the Red Sea, the paschal lamb, the column of fire, etc. The connection between the Jewish and the Christian Pasch explains the movable character of this feast. Easter has no fixed date, like Christmas, because the 15th of Nisan of the Semitic calendar was shifting from date to date on the Julian calendar. Since Christ, the true Paschal Lamb, had been slain on the very day when the Jews, in celebration of their Passover, immolated the figurative lamb, the Jewish Christians in the Orient followed the Jewish method, and commemorated the death of Christ on the 15th of Nisan and His Resurrection on the 17th of Nisan, no matter on what day of the week they fell. For this observance they claimed the authority of St. John and St. Philip. 

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