• St. Nicholas sanctuary in Lent. Photo Credit: Stephen E. Jackson Photography
  • Each year a new Easter Candle is purchased and lit for ...
  • Autumn colors are used in the fall to decorate the sanctuary. ...
  • There are poor boxes at all four entrances of the church. ...

Thank you for visiting the Website of St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Laurel, Maryland, USA.

We are a relaxed, friendly, mid-size parish of families and single adults with room for you! We have plenty of parking and beautiful grounds.

Since 1967, parishioners of St. Nicholas Church have worshiped God and served the people of Laurel, Maryland. We are a diverse and growing community of grace, healing and salvation, and we invite you to join us for Mass and parish celebrations.

Vision Statement

St. Nicholas Catholic Parish is a center of grace, healing and salvation. Jesus Christ and His Gospel are the heart of our parish. St. Nicholas is a sanctuary where we find a sense of meaning and purpose. The celebration of Mass and the Sacraments are the means by which we give glory to God, and the Eucharist is the food that nourishes our life with Christ. Our faith and hope are in Christ alone, and our love for Jesus makes us willing to share our time, talent and treasure with our neighbors on earth to build the Kingdom of God. St. Nicholas is our support and our family.

Mass Times

Weekend Masses
5:00 p.m. Saturday
8:00 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
11:30 a.m. Sunday

Weekday Mases
8:30 a.m. in the church, Monday to Saturday

Office Hours

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
For emergencies after hours, call 301-490-5116 and follow the directions to reach Father Mel Ayala, pastor.

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Daily Readings

Saint of the Day

St. Arsenius

St. Arsenius, an Anchorite, was born in 354 at Rome and died in 450 at Troe, in Egypt. Theodosius the Great, having requested the Emperor Gratian and Pope Damasus to find him in the West a tutor for his son Arcadius, decided on Arsenius, a man well read in Greek literature, a member of a noble Roman family, and said to have been a deacon of the Roman Church. Upon receving the request to become the tutor of young Arcadius, he left and reached Constantinople in 383, and continued as tutor in the imperial family for eleven years, during the last three of which he also had charge of his pupil's brother Honorius. Coming one day to see his children at their studies, Theodosius found them sitting while Arsenius talked to them standing. This he would not tolerate, and he ordered the teacher to sit while the pupils to stood. Upon his arrival at court, Arsenius had been given a splendid establishment, and probably because the Emperor so desired, he lived a very great lifestyle, but all the time felt a growing inclination to renounce the world. After praying for a long time to be enlightened as to what he should do, he heard a voice saying "Arsenius, flee the company of men, and thou shalt be saved." Thereupon he embarked secretly for Alexandria, and hastening to the desert of Scetis, asked to be admitted among the solitaries who dwelt there. St. John the Dwarf, to whose cell he was conducted, though previously warned of the quality of his visitor, took no notice of him and left him standing by himself while he invited the rest to sit down at table. When the John was half finished with his meal, he threw down some bread before Arsenius, bidding him with an air of indifference to eat if he would. Arsenius meekly picked up the bread and ate, sitting on the ground. Satisfied with this proof of humility, St. John kept him under his direction. The new solitary was from the beginning most exemplary, yet unwittingly retained some of his old habits, such as sitting cross-legged or laying one foot over the other. Noticing this, the abbot requested some one to imitate Arsenius's posture at the next gathering of the brethren, and upon his doing so, forthwith rebuked him publicly. Arsenius took the hint and corrected himself. During the fifty-five years of his solitary life he was always the most meanly clad of all, thus punishing himself for his former seeming vanity in the world. In like manner, to atone for having used perfumes at court, he never changed the water in which he moistened the palm leaves of which he made mats, but only poured in fresh water upon it as it wasted, thus letting it become stenchy in the extreme. Even while engaged in manual labour he never relaxed in his application to prayer. At all times copious tears of devotion fell from his eyes. But what distinguished him the most was his disinclination to all that might interrupt his union with God. When, after a long period of searching, his place of retreat was discovered, he not only refused to return to court and act as adviser to his former pupil the Emperor Arcadius, but he would not even be his almoner to the poor and the monasteries of the neighbourhood. He invariably denied himself to visitors, no matter what their rank and condition and left to his disciples the care of entertaining them. His contemporaries so greatly admired him because of this, that they gave him the surname "the Great".

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