• St. Nicholas sanctuary in Lent. Photo Credit: Stephen E. Jackson Photography
  • Each year a new Easter Candle is purchased and lit for ...
  • Autumn colors are used in the fall to decorate the sanctuary. ...
  • There are poor boxes at all four entrances of the church. ...

Thank you for visiting the Website of St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Laurel, Maryland, USA.

We are a relaxed, friendly, mid-size parish of families and single adults with room for you! We have plenty of parking and beautiful grounds, and we are looking forward to our 50th anniversary in 2017.

Since 1967, parishioners of St. Nicholas Church have worshipped God and served the people of Laurel, Maryland. We are a diverse and growing community of grace, healing and salvation, and we invite you to join us for Mass and parish celebrations.

Vision Statement

St. Nicholas Catholic Parish is a center of grace, healing and salvation. Jesus Christ and His Gospel are the heart of our parish. St. Nicholas is a sanctuary where we find a sense of meaning and purpose. The celebration of Mass and the Sacraments are the means by which we give glory to God, and the Eucharist is the food that nourishes our life with Christ. Our faith and hope are in Christ alone, and our love for Jesus makes us willing to share our time, talent and treasure with our neighbors on earth to build the Kingdom of God. St. Nicholas is our support and our family.

Mass Times

Weekend Masses
5:00 p.m. Saturday
8:00 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
11:30 a.m. Sunday

Weekday Mases
8:30 a.m. in the church, Monday to Saturday
6:30 p.m. on Fridays of Lent, followed by Stations of the Cross at 7:00 p.m.

Office Hours

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday
For emergencies after hours, call 301-490-5116 and follow the directions to reach Father Jack Kennealy, pastor.

Events

July

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31

View all events »

Staff

Google Map

Blog Summary

Daily Readings

Saint of the Day

St. Peter Chrysologus

On July 30, the Catholic Church celebrates Saint Peter Chrysologus, a fifth-century Italian bishop known for testifying courageously to Christ's full humanity and divinity during a period of doctrinal confusion in the Church. The saint's title, Chrysologus, signifies “golden speech� in Greek. Named as a Doctor of the Church in 1729, he is distinguished as the “Doctor of Homilies� for the concise but theologically rich reflections he delivered during his time as the Bishop of Ravenna. His surviving works offer eloquent testimony to the Church's traditional beliefs about Mary's perpetual virginity, the penitential value of Lent, Christ's Eucharistic presence, and the primacy of St. Peter and his successors in the Church. Few details of St. Peter Chrysologus' biography are known. He was born in the Italian town of Imola in either the late fourth or early fifth century, but sources differ as to whether this occurred around 380 or as late as 406. Following his study of theology, Peter was ordained to the diaconate by Imola's local bishop Cornelius, whom he greatly admired and regarded as his spiritual father. Cornelius not only ordained Peter, but taught him the value of humility and self-denial. The lessons of his mentor inspired Peter to live as a monk for many years, embracing a lifestyle of asceticism, simplicity, and prayer. His simple monastic life came to an end, however, after the death of Archbishop John of Ravenna in 430. After John's death, the clergy and people of Ravenna chose a successor and asked Cornelius, still the Bishop of Imola, to journey to Rome and obtain papal approval for the candidate. Cornelius brought Peter, then still a deacon, along with him on the visit to Pope Sixtus III. Tradition relates that the Pope had experienced a vision from God on the night before the meeting, commanding him to overrule Ravenna's choice of a new archbishop. The Pope declared that Peter, instead, was to be ordained as John's successor. In Ravenna, Peter was received warmly by the Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III, and his mother Galla Placidia. She is said to have given him the title of “Chrysologus� because of his preaching skills. Throughout the archdiocese, however, he encountered the surviving remnants of paganism along with various abuses and distortions of the Catholic faith. Peter exercised zeal and pastoral care in curbing abuses and evangelizing non-Christians during his leadership of the Church in Ravenna. One of the major heresies of his age, monophysitism, held that Christ did not possess a distinct human nature in union with his eternal divine nature. Peter labored to prevent the westward spread of this error, promoted from Constantinople by the monk Eutyches. The Archbishop of Ravenna also made improvements to the city's cathedral and built several new churches. Near the end of his life he addressed a significant letter to Eutyches, stressing the Pope's authority in the monophysite controversy. Having returned to Imola in anticipation of his death, St. Peter Chrysologus died in 450, one year before the Church's official condemnation of monophysitism. He is credited as the author of around 176 surviving homilies, which contributed to his later proclamation as a Doctor of the Church.

Read More